Friendly Friday

Helpful reminders about the sun and summer ~
It’s that time of year ~ summer time!  The following is an article I found in some items from my other line of work. Like I tell my clients in regard to any new supplements/treatments/lifestyle changes, please check with your physician to make sure it’s all right to use them.
~ Here Comes the Sun ~ Updated UV Index Shines Light on Rays
A crucial warning system has been recently updated for your skin’s protection. In compliance with the World Health Organization, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Weather Service revamped the UV Index, a system created to alert people about the level of harmful ultraviolet (UV) light rays from the sun. Overexposure to UV rays can cause wrinkles and premature aging, skin cancer, cataracts, and immune system suppression.
Many factors influence the strength of UV rays: UV light is stronger in the summer, at higher altitudes, and in areas closer to the equator. It’s also stronger at midday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., when the sun is directly overhead.
The new UV index ranges from 0-11 with guidelines as follows:
0-2: low. Minimal exposure for the average person, but watch for reflected UV from snow and water.
3-5: moderate. Stay in the shade during midday. Cover-up outside.
6-7: high. Wear a hat, sunglasses, and a sunscreen with a minimum sun protection factor (SPF) of 15. Avoid midday sun.
8-10: very high. Take extra precautions, and avoid midday sun. Wear protective clothing.
11: extreme. Take all precautions, seek shade, and avoid midday sun. If possible, stay indoors.
As part of its daily forecast, the National Weather Service publishes the UV index for each area of the country. Go to http://www.epa.gov/sunwise/uvindex.html and enter your zip code to find your UV index for the day. The Weather Channel, as well as most local TV stations, include the UV index in their weather forecast. It can also be found at
www.weather.com.  For a detailed description of the UV index, or for more information on sun protection, visit www.epa.gov/sunwise.
This article is for entertainment purposes only and is not intended to diagnose and/or treat any conditions. Please check with your physician to make sure it’s all right to use new products and/or change your regimen. Newsletter article courtesy of Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals
& if you’re out in the sun and heat, make sure to drink plenty of water.
Water: Did you know that if a person is feeling thirsty, fatigued, headachy, hungry, or is cramping, they are most likely dehydrated?  Did you know that your body produces about one cup of water a day in the process of converting food to energy but loses about ten cups through respiration, excretion, and sweating and combined with drinking sugary and/or caffeinated beverages and not enough plain water most people are dehydrated and don’t even know it?  Did you know that athletes, physically active people and those living in hot, dry climates are even more susceptible to dehydration?  A good rule of thumb when it comes to drinking water: drink half your body weight in ounces of water a day.  So if you’re 150 lbs then you should be drinking at least 75 oz of water a day.

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